Discover the New You with TRT from Med Matrix

Med Matrix - Your Partner in Vitality

  • medicine-logo
  • global-logo
  • healthcare-logo
  • maine-logo
  • essential-logo

Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Sebago, ME

As men age, they experience both positive and negative changes. Many middle-aged men learn to let the little things go and focus on family and friendship. They develop new hobbies and reach their peak earning potential. On the flip side, many men undergo unexpected hormonal changes around this same age. That's a hard pill to swallow for a lot of males, but contrary to common belief, having low testosterone isn't reserved for elderly men.

Studies show that around 55% of males suffer from low testosterone. For many, that drop-off happens in their 40s and 50s. But the truth is that testosterone levels can start to decline as early as age 30, leading to various physical and emotional changes such as decreased energy, increased aches and pains, and even sexual performance issues.

If you're a man experiencing symptoms of low testosterone - like ED or erectile dysfunction - you may feel embarrassed, depressed, or like all hope is lost. Fortunately, nothing could be further from the truth. Male health clinics like Med Matrix offer advanced, FDA-approved treatments like testosterone replacement therapy in Sebago, ME, to help restore your hormone levels. When your hormones are balanced, it's almost like everything clicks back into place without having to take pills or suffer through surgery.

TRT Clinic Sebago, ME

The Med Matrix Difference

Did you know that testosterone is the foundation of all male performance? It's the reason why, in your early 20s, you could have a fun night out on the town and wake up the next morning ready to hit the basketball court. It's the reason why you feel the drive to succeed and find a mate.

Unfortunately, testosterone levels start to decline around the age of 35 (and sometimes sooner, depending on various factors). Past that age, your T levels drop even more. 40% of men over 45 have sub-optimal levels, which can have a negative effect on things like your:

  • Energy Levels
  • Libido
  • Workout Recovery
  • Focus
  • Body Fat
  • Strength
  • Ability to Build Muscle
  • More

Many men approaching middle age aren't even aware that their testosterone levels are dropping. Other males simply don't care and begrudgingly accept the new, uninteresting life that looms in front of them. Today, however, more and more men are ditching that mindset and reclaiming their lives with testosterone replacement therapy in Sebago, ME.

How Does TRT Work?

One of the most common questions we get at Med Matrix is, "What does TRT do?" Testosterone replacement therapy does what its name implies: It's a science-backed therapy that replaces low testosterone levels in men. The main objective of going on a TRT regimen is to improve your life and wellbeing by balancing your hormones. Also referred to as androgen replacement therapy, TRT helps many men deal with and overcome the debilitating side effects of low T.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy works by giving your body the testosterone it needs to function properly. Without healthy levels of testosterone, the male body can't maintain the natural processes necessary for overall health. In fact, men with low testosterone levels are more prone to serious health problems such as type-2 diabetes and even heart disease.

Until their testosterone levels are restored to normal, most men suffer until they find a solution. That's where TRT comes into play. With balanced hormones, the body can finally begin to heal, causing most symptoms of low testosterone to diminish greatly.

 TRT Men's Clinic Sebago, ME

Med Matrix Does TRT Right

Unlike some male health clinics, doctors from Med Matrix approach TRT in the right way. We provide custom plans and helpful tools that change as your body does. Patients choose our testosterone replacement therapy programs because they are:

 Hormone Replacement Testing Sebago, ME

Personalized

When you trust Med Matrix with your TRT plan, you never have to worry about working with inexperienced practitioners or "professionals" who don't have your best interests at heart. Instead, you'll gain access to hormone and peptide protocols based on your biology and goals, delivered by experienced medical doctors. We never prescribe TRT based on someone who matches your height, weight, and age. We conduct advanced testing and craft your plan based on you, not someone else.

 TRT Medical Practice Sebago, ME

Results-Driven

Doctors from our male health center in Sebago make it a point to stay in touch and analyze how your TRT regimen is going. From cutting-edge diagnostics to deep clinical expertise, get the science-backed tools and support you need to reach your peak - and stay there.

 Men's Health Medical Practice Sebago, ME

Safe, Easy, & Non-Invasive

Getting on testosterone replacement therapy in Sebago, ME, is safe and easy when you work with Med Matrix. You don't have to worry about surgery or long recovery times. Once we get to know you, your body, and your goals with TRT, the only thing you have to focus on is living your best life.

Get Started ASAP

Joining Med Matrix's testosterone replacement therapy program is as easy as 1-2-3

Testing

Testing

Complete our hormone test and body composition scan so we can track your progress.

Consultation

Consultation

During your consultation, we'll get to know you better, go over your bloodwork, and learn more about your needs and goals as it relates to TRT. This consultation can take place via telehealth or from our male health clinic in South Sebago - the choice is up to you.

Supply

Supply

Med Matrix offers competitive hormone pricing and access to other cutting-edge treatments such as peptides and stem cells.

Here are the 5 Biggest Benefits of Going on TRT in Sebago, ME

Up to this point, we've talked a bunch about how beneficial TRT can be for men who have declining testosterone levels. But you may be wondering how TRT specifically benefits you and your body. Here are just a few of the biggest benefits of starting testosterone replacement therapy at Med Matrix.

TRT Clinic Sebago, ME

Higher Levels of Energy

The effects of TRT are not immediate and may not be noticeable at first. However, typically, psychological improvements can be felt within three to four weeks of starting treatment. Most individuals experience reduced fatigue, improved sleep, and an overall feeling of being more rested after about a month of treatment. By this time, you may also notice increased motivation to engage in physical activities, which are crucial for your wellbeing and quality of life.

Higher-Levels-Energy

Better Sex Life

If there's one thing that men hate most about having low testosterone, it's that their ability to perform in the bedroom becomes compromised. In fact, diminished sexual function, including low sex drive and erectile dysfunction, is one of the most common reasons why men seek treatment for low T. That's for good reason: Recent research shows a strong correlation between libido and testosterone levels.

Fortunately, testosterone replacement therapy in Sebago, ME, can enhance healthy sexual relations with your spouse or partner. Increased testosterone levels in men often lead to increased sexual activity. At Med Matrix, many of our patients report having a higher sex drive within the first three to four weeks of treatment. Many men also reported having stronger and longer-lasting erections.

More-Mental-Clarity

More Mental Clarity and Focus

Testosterone has a significant impact on cognitive performance, including memory, concentration, and reasoning. When testosterone levels are low, mental function can suffer. When you begin TRT, the heavy cloud that has been hanging over you can start to dissipate. Mental focus, cognition, and memory show signs of improvement after the first few weeks of treatment. Feelings of depression and sudden mood swings start to subside within three to six weeks. By 18 to 30 weeks, you will notice a significant improvement in self-confidence and mental clarity, as well as an inner strength that is more prepared to face life's challenges.

Normalized-Blood-Sugar

Normalized Blood Sugar Levels

When experiencing hypogonadism, your insulin sensitivity may be compromised, leading to fluctuations in blood sugar levels and an elevated risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Testosterone replacement therapy boosts your insulin sensitivity, enabling your body to efficiently absorb glucose from your blood after a meal.

Typically, significant improvements in blood glucose levels and insulin sensitivity are observed after about three months, with the full effect manifesting after a year. Also, remember this: TRT has been shown to increase your motivation. The tiniest spark of motivation can propel you to become more physically active, further boosting your insulin sensitivity.

Healthy-Red-Blood-Cell

Healthy Red Blood Cell Count

Your body produces red blood cells through a process called erythropoiesis. When you suffer from hypogonadism (low T), red blood cell production can slow, leading to anemia. Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) can help improve red blood cell count, reduce fatigue, and stabilize blood pressure. Results may vary based on age and dosage, but improvements are typically noticeable after three months, with peak benefits at nine to 12 months.

We should note that some TRT patients have higher hematocrit levels than normal (>51%) and need to donate blood regularly as a result. That's why it's important to work with seasoned male health doctors - like those at Med Matrix - when you're considering TRT in Sebago, ME.

Build-Bigger-Muscles

Build Bigger Muscles

Who doesn't want a great physique? Diet, rest, and exercise are crucial for success. However, when your testosterone levels drop below the normal range, your strength decreases, your body mass decreases, and your once-unstoppable endurance diminishes. Testosterone plays a key role in improving these areas.

Do You Have These Symptoms of Low Testosterone?

Are you used to blasting through your day with productivity and positivity? Have you noticed that you're losing muscle mass and the desire to be with your spouse? Has your partner been complaining that you're too irritable to be around? If you're usually not a curmudgeon, your body is probably trying to tell you something. It could be time to speak with a doctor about testosterone replacement therapy in Sebago, ME. Keep a running tally of whichever of the following symptoms you notice happening in your life.

 TRT Men's Clinic Sebago, ME

Two words that send shivers down the spines of every man are "erectile dysfunction." Unfortunately, when your T levels are lower than they should be, this is one of the most common symptoms that men must endure. Being unable to get it up isn't just embarrassing - it can be downright depressing and lead to issues with mental health. It's a hard topic to discuss, but a personalized TRT plan from Med Matrix can help.

Decreased energy was once considered a normal part of aging. Nowadays, we know better. Most doctors understand that low energy levels can be linked to low testosterone levels. If you're finding it difficult to engage in activities you used to enjoy, like playing with your kids or going for a workout, it could be a sign of low testosterone. Sure, it's normal to feel tired from time to time. But persistent fatigue and a serious lack of drive might mean something more.

A study from 2011 revealed that men who lose a week's worth of sleep may experience a 15% reduction in testosterone levels. Additional research found that almost 15% of workers get five hours of sleep or less per night. These findings suggest that sleep loss can negatively impact testosterone levels and wellbeing. The big takeaway here is that men who have trouble sleeping often suffer from lower testosterone. If you find yourself exhausted at the end of the day but struggle to sleep through the night, you may be one of those men.

Many people over the age of 50 experience memory loss and lack of concentration. It's a normal part of aging. However, those signs can also mean you have low T. A study from 2006 discovered that males with low testosterone levels performed poorly on cognitive skill tests. This suggests that low testosterone can contribute to reduced cognitive ability. If you can't stay focused on tasks or can't recall words like you used to, have your testosterone levels checked. You could be a prime candidate for TRT.

If you're like millions of other men, coming to grips with hair loss isn't something you want to do. Closely related to hormone imbalances and testosterone decline, hair loss is stressful and embarrassing. It's often related to a derivative of testosterone called DHT. Too much DHT in your body can cause hair follicles to stop production, causing them to die. Because hair located at the front and crown is more sensitive to DHT, it grows slower than other follicles and eventually stops growing altogether. While you can't alter your genes, you can address low testosterone in your body. Whether you're suffering from thinning hair or hair loss across your entire head, TRT and solutions like peptides and stem cells can stop your head from shedding hair.

Gynecomastia, also known as "man boobs," is the enlargement of male breast tissue, often caused by hormonal imbalances and an increase in estrogen. Elevated estrogen levels during andropause, also known as male menopause, usually occur due to a lack of testosterone. If you're a man between 40 and 55 and feel embarrassed about having large breasts, ask your doctor about TRT. When combined with a healthy diet and exercise, it could be the solution to your problem without needing surgery.

Live Life on Your Own Terms with Help from Med Matrix

Just because you're getting older doesn't mean you have to accept a decline in your health and wellbeing. Our male health clinic was founded to give patients like you - men suffering from low T - hope that life can get better. With our doctors and male health practitioners by your side, it's easy to take the first step.

When combined with healthy life choices and regular exercise, TRT in Sebago, ME, is one of the best ways to turn back the hands of time without going under the knife. If you're looking to bridge the gap between an unsatisfying past and a promising future, it's time to contact our male health clinic.

Men with low T choose Med Matrix because we:

  • Prioritize Custom TRT Prescriptions
  • Get a Full Understanding of Your Needs and Goals
  • Provide Compassionate Care from a Team of Licensed Doctors and Experts
  • Specialize in Affordable Male Health Services

Unlike some TRT clinics, we know that your health and wellness goals are unique. At Med Matrix, you'll never have to worry about a "set it and forget it" approach. We're with you every step of the way. If you're ready to reclaim the best parts of being a man, contact our office and ask about setting up your testosterone replacement therapy consultation today.

Request a Consultation

Latest News in Sebago, ME

Owners of century-old Sebago Lake resort win lifetime achievement award

Contributed / Justin Johnson PhotographyJoan Porta visited Migis Lodge on Sebago Lake as a guest in 1979 and fell in love with both the Casco resort and the owners’ son, Tim.A few months later, she and Tim were married, and as Porta recalls, “I never left!”Contributed / Migis Hotel GroupTim and Joan Porta were recently honored with the Master of New England Innkeeping Lifetime Achievement Award from the New England Inns & Resorts Association.“That was a surprise, I ...

Contributed / Justin Johnson Photography

Joan Porta visited Migis Lodge on Sebago Lake as a guest in 1979 and fell in love with both the Casco resort and the owners’ son, Tim.

A few months later, she and Tim were married, and as Porta recalls, “I never left!”

Contributed / Migis Hotel Group

Tim and Joan Porta were recently honored with the Master of New England Innkeeping Lifetime Achievement Award from the New England Inns & Resorts Association.

“That was a surprise, I never saw that coming at all, but it was a thrill,” Porta said. “Our careers as innkeepers were their own reward … this was the frosting on the cake.”

Porta, whose husband is now living in an assisted living facility, said she’s winding down on her career at Migis.

“It’s been a great 44 years,” she said.

Advertisement

The award is the association’s top honor, and celebrates individuals who have made an indelible mark on the culture of hospitality.

Migis Lodge has been in business since 1916. On 135 wooded acres with 3,500 feet of shoreline, it has a main lodge and 35 cottages, a main dining room, a private island for cookouts and a wellness center. It offers waterskiing and other boating activities and has courts for tennis, pickleball and basketball and lots of programs for children.

“The land is sacred and precious,” Porta said. “We don’t feel like we own it, but rather it’s in our care for now. We do our best to share it with people and keep it as preserved as possible.”

Many of its guests have returned each year for generations.

“A lot of adults feel like they’re coming back to camp,” Porta said. “We’ve made tremendous friendships over the years from all over the country.”

She enjoys “meeting a variety of people when they’re relaxed and feeling at home.”

Advertisement

“We’re so lucky to have a job where you make people happy,” Porta said. “What’s more gratifying than that?”

Porta said she’s worked almost every job at Migis. In the early years, she said, most of her work was in the kitchen and bake shop.

The Portas’ son, Jed, is the third-generation manager of the lodge.

“Migis Lodge has been a labor of love for my family,” he said. “The longevity and success we’ve achieved are a testament to the warm and welcoming environment my parents have fostered.”

Past winners of the New England Inns & Resorts Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award in Maine include the owners of the Inn by the Sea in Cape Elizabeth, the Captain Lord Mansion in Kennebunkport and the Sebasco Harbor Resort in Phippsburg.

Comments are not available on this story.

Send questions/comments to the editors.

Three on Sebago Nov. 7 ballot to fill vacant Select Board seat

October 20th, 2023SEBAGO — Three candidates will be on the Nov. 7 ballot to fill a position on the Sebago Select Board.A member vacated his seat — a term which expires June 30, 2025 — on the Select Board. Seeking election are candidates Carolyn Calarese, David Hague and Alan Tabor.The Spaulding Memorial Library is once again pleased to sponsor a Meet the Candidates article about the candidates. Two — Calarese and Hague — have offered answers to questions posed to them. The third (Tabor) fail...

October 20th, 2023

SEBAGO — Three candidates will be on the Nov. 7 ballot to fill a position on the Sebago Select Board.

A member vacated his seat — a term which expires June 30, 2025 — on the Select Board. Seeking election are candidates Carolyn Calarese, David Hague and Alan Tabor.

The Spaulding Memorial Library is once again pleased to sponsor a Meet the Candidates article about the candidates. Two — Calarese and Hague — have offered answers to questions posed to them. The third (Tabor) failed to submit answers. The candidate responses are presented alphabetically.

Candidate: Carolyn Calarese

Family Info: My Husband and I are third generation, both set of grandparents bought in Sebago in ’54. My grandparents Charlie and Ruth Binda were residents for 20-plus years. We have two adult children — daughter Danielle, 27, of Medway, Mass. and Anthony, 25, of Austin Texas.

Work/community/civic experience: I’m the VP of Operations for Calarese Group; we are a B2B independent Sales Representatives that service the Food Service, Janitorial & Industrial supply businesses. I work with several on a daily basis with schools, universities, municipalities, property and section 10 management companies, corporate food service entities & chain accounts on building budgets and strategies for development and sales.

Experience: I was on the Sebago Planning Board for a year, NESSA board for a 3-year term (business). I’ve had MMA trainings.

Community: I’ve been a coach, CCD teacher, on several PTOs, and Girl Scout leader – I’m not shy to volunteer.

Q. Why did you decide to run for office? Honestly, I wanted to be more a part of the community and bring some of my ideas to the table. Sebago is very important to my family. I believe my skills set would be an asset to the town. I have strong negotiation skills and I will work in the town’s best interest.

Q. What strengths do you feel you would bring to this position? How can you help? I’m honest, independent thinker, hard-working, and I can be trusted to do the right things for the town. Transparency is important and if I’m unsure, I will go to great lengths to learn and ask.

Q. Are you willing to attend classes offered by MMA (Maine Municipal Association) to learn about the relevant ordinances, statutes, etc. that govern the boards and their actions? Absolutely, the more education the better

Q. What do you think are the major issues facing the town? Do you have any ideas how to address these? This town is facing massive growth quickly. We as a town have to make sure we are doing all we can to keep its integrity and to stay within our budget by doing so. Plus, we need to engage more residents (new families) and communicate better with the public. I’m hoping to be able to get this accomplished quickly, so as a town, we can be a stronger as a community.

Q. Finally, how would you answer a person asking, “Why should I vote for you?” YOU CAN TRUST that I’m here to listen TO ALL residents of this town and work in your best interest.

Candidate: David Hague

Family Info: I am retired from Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, and I worked another 16 years at Dearborn Precision Tubular Products in Fryeburg. Married to Eileen (Douglass) for 42 years. My wife’s family has lived in Sebago for the last 10 generations. Our son Eric attended Sebago Elementary and graduated from Lake Region High School. Eric is currently a Chief Engineer in the Merchant Marines and a Commander in the U.S. Navy Reserves.

Work/community/civic experience: I have served the Town of Sebago on the Budget Committee; as a selectman, and as the town manager. I wrote several Town Ordinances including the instructions for the Capital Investment Program. I joined Sebago Center Community Church in 1990, where I taught Sunday School and coordinated the Youth Group activities for many years.

Q. Why did you decide to run for office? I have valuable historical knowledge of past municipal decisions. I would like to use my experience to help the Board of Selectmen solve town problems and to prevent future problems. I am fiscally responsible, and I fully understand how budget decisions control the mil rate and the tax bills.

Q. What strengths do you feel you would bring to this position? How can you help? I am a team player who works with others to solve problems. I helped to develop and implement the CIP Program for Sebago. During my time as town manager, Sebago received a new mini-pumper fire truck, a forestry fire truck, a new ambulance, a new dump truck, a new plow truck, and a used roll-off container truck. All purchases were made without incurring debt. I know how to monitor work in progress and to report timely assessments. I encourage residents to openly express their concerns.

Q. Are you willing to attend classes offered by MMA (Maine Municipal Association) to learn about the relevant ordinances, statutes, etc. that govern the boards and their actions? I am very thankful for MMA. They taught me how to develop and manage municipal budgets; how to moderate meetings, the responsibilities of municipal officers and town managers. Their experience, wisdom and legal advice is very valuable to municipalities. I will gladly attend every training session associated with my responsibilities. The Greater Portland Council of Governments is another valuable resource for training and for problem solving.

Q. What do you think are the major issues facing the town? Do you have any ideas how to address these? The answer to this question could fill pages. Respecting the ideas of others; proper open communication; developing effective guidelines; updating town ordinances; efficient procurement of town equipment; showing appreciation and support for volunteers; ensuring fair tax rates; and supporting the school system. The Undesignated Fund Balance must be properly managed. Town debt should be paid in full annually. Every day, new issues will arise and new problems will become known. Selectmen must be ready to provide proactive leadership that achieves results through positive teamwork.

Q. Finally, how would you answer a person asking, “Why should I vote for you?” I graduated with honors from the University of Southern Maine. I have more than 30 years of supervisory, administrative, and management experience. I have well developed communication skills. My leadership abilities include effective time management, accurate long-range planning, with demonstrated conflict management and cooperation with others. Through years of leadership, I have learned: to earn the respect of others; to perform well under pressure; to be influential in decision making; to accept criticism gracefully and to respond positively; to keep all promises and commitments; to set a good example by working efficiently and effectively; to keep others informed as to what is expected; to spread enthusiasm; and to integrate continuous quality improvement into every business function.

I enjoy challenging work. I enjoy helping others. I would appreciate the opportunity to once again serve the Town of Sebago.

Officials say Portland man who drowned in Sebago Lake was not wearing life jacket

Ahmed Doale, 28, reportedly drowned while bringing a boat into shore, Maine wardens said. Officials say alcohol may have been a contributing factor.More VideosCASCO, Maine — The Maine Warden Service Dive Team on Monday recovered the body of a Portland man who drowned in Sebago Lake.Ahmed Doale, 28, did not know how to swim, Maine Warden Service spokesperson Mark Latti said in a release Monday. His body was found around 9:15 a....

Ahmed Doale, 28, reportedly drowned while bringing a boat into shore, Maine wardens said. Officials say alcohol may have been a contributing factor.

More Videos

CASCO, Maine — The Maine Warden Service Dive Team on Monday recovered the body of a Portland man who drowned in Sebago Lake.

Ahmed Doale, 28, did not know how to swim, Maine Warden Service spokesperson Mark Latti said in a release Monday. His body was found around 9:15 a.m. in about eight feet of water about 10 feet from shore, Latti said.

Wardens also said Doale was not wearing a life jacket and they believe alcohol may have been a contributing factor.

Doale was on an 18-foot 1999 Regal motorboat with another person Sunday evening when the boat broke down and drifted towards shore near a deep area of Sebago Lake State Park at the mouth of the Songo River, Latti said.

"Doale got out of the boat to push it free from shore, near where there was a steep, deep drop very close to shore in this location, and as he was pushing the boat out, he stepped into deep water," Latti stated.

According to officials, Doale then submerged under the water and never resurfaced. Witnesses on shore heard yelling and called 911, Latti said.

Maine Game Wardens, Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office, state park staff, Casco Fire Rescue, Raymond Fire Rescue, Naples Fire Department, and Naples Marine Patrol responded and searched the area for Ahmed for several hours Sunday but were unable to locate him, Latti said.

The Maine Warden Service Dive Team searched for Doale on Monday with four divers and a boat.

For people who visited Sebago Lake State Park on Labor Day, just hours after Doale's body was recovered, it's a reminder to be alert as the summer comes to a close.

"When I think about a lake, I think it is a generally safer body of water than the ocean," Dean Russell said, who visited Sebago from Portland with his partner, Michelle Martin.

"I think it would be different if we had children, a lot more cautious," Martin added.

For people who live at Sebago Lake, like Jim Fickett, the news that Doale wasn't wearing a life jacket is frustrating.

"It's super frustrating knowing it's something that could have been avoided," Fickett said.

Fickett grew up on Sebago Lake and is the owner of Honey Badger Guide Service, a fishing charter, out of Raymond.

"It feels awful, even more awful because I was out there five minutes away. If anyone knows how to contact someone, we will come and get you... You don't leave someone alone."

Fickett said if you find yourself in a position like Doale did, to just wait patiently until you can get help. He said even if you are unsure, you should not take the risk.

"It's a lake but it is big water out here and you can get in trouble in a hurry," Fickett said.

Fickett said to call the warden service if you are in an emergency and if you need a tow on Sebago, you should call Tow Sebago, a company Fickett said opened this year that will tow people to shore.

Fickett also said the Facebook group "I Boat on Sebago Lake" is quick to respond and will respond to people who post on their requesting help if they are stranded.

For the latest breaking news, weather, and traffic alerts, download the NEWS CENTER Maine mobile app.

Tap Lines: How Sebago Brewing Co. got its start and has stayed relevant for 25 years

The year is 1998. Bill Clinton is impeached by the House of Representatives. Viagra is approved by the FDA. Google is founded. “Titanic” wins 11 Academy Awards, and “The Big Lebowski” debuts. The Chicago Bulls win their sixth NBA title in eight years, as Michael Jordan plays his final game for the team, the same year that Celtics star Jayson Tatum is born. The historic Ice Storm slams Maine. And a new brewpub, S...

The year is 1998. Bill Clinton is impeached by the House of Representatives. Viagra is approved by the FDA. Google is founded. “Titanic” wins 11 Academy Awards, and “The Big Lebowski” debuts. The Chicago Bulls win their sixth NBA title in eight years, as Michael Jordan plays his final game for the team, the same year that Celtics star Jayson Tatum is born. The historic Ice Storm slams Maine. And a new brewpub, Sebago Brewing Co., opens in the Maine Mall parking lot, in a building previously occupied by a Chinese restaurant called Hu Ke Lau.

Sebago is celebrating its 25th anniversary this summer, joining about a dozen other Maine breweries that remain open since its debut. A celebration last weekend marked the occasion, the sun unexpectedly edging the clouds off the forecast, as Sebago’s three co-founders – Kai Adams, Tim Haines and Brad Monarch – smilingly made the rounds.

The three met while working at chain restaurant Chili’s, near the mall. Adams had been the brewmaster at Sea Dog Brewing Co. in Camden and had designs on opening his own brewpub, so he took the job at Chili’s to learn more about that side of the business. Haines and Monarch, who both had extensive restaurant experience, were managers there when Adams arrived in 1996. Before long, they were hatching plans for a brewpub of their own (perhaps with Chili’s (in)famous “Baby Back Ribs” jingle, released in 1997, as a soundtrack). Those plans were realized when the trio mustered roughly $300,000 from their own pockets, other investors and a Small Business Administration loan.

“We always went in with the mindset that Sebago was going to be a restaurant with fresh craft beer rather than a brewery with food,” Haines recalled. “The three of us had a shared passion for hospitality. I set up the front of the house and bar; Brad headed up the back of the house and ran the kitchen; Kai was in charge of the brewery – we all had our own areas from the beginning.”

In March 1998, Adams and Monarch wrote Sebago’s first check for their brewhouse. That 10-barrel system had originally been built in New Jersey for a brewpub in Singapore, where it was only used three times before the business went under. A restaurateur in Kona took it off the brewpub’s hands, but never installed it. Sebago scooped it up and put it on a 17-day trip, via shipping container and train, to South Portland.

Once it arrived, that system would draw its water from the brewery’s namesake – Sebago Lake. It is a body of water that has been underpinning Maine beer since the swashbuckling McGlinchy brothers were illegally (but quite publicly) brewing and advertising their beer as “SEBAGO WATER ALE” in 1871, flaunting the contemporaneous (and prohibitionary) Maine Law.

Advertisement

Sebago Brewing Co. would channel those waters into four original offerings: Northern Light Ale (now known as Saddleback Ale), Lake Trout Stout, Boathouse Brown Ale, and the now-classic Frye’s Leap IPA, a balanced IPA featuring Cascade, Columbus and Centennial hops, providing those classic American pine and grapefruit pale ale notes.

Adams points to a couple key elements of the craft beer milieu that helped them get off the ground.

“Before we owned Sebago, we’d call other breweries up and say, ‘Hey, I’m having this problem, what are you doing?’ What that became is a lot of camaraderie in the mechanical and practical ways to fix things. There weren’t a lot of those kinds of resources in the beginning. It was great to reach out to other brewers and get support, and as Sebago Brewing grew, we shared information with other breweries. That’s why it’s the way it is today in Maine.”

Another key resource was the Maine Brewers’ Guild, which had been around for roughly a half-decade when Sebago opened. According to Adams, the guild was “instrumental in bringing a lot of the industry tools and knowledge to the brewers” – things like access to equipment, ingredients, and technical support.

Sebago soon opened new brewpubs in the Old Port (in 2000) and Gorham (2001), in an erstwhile train station originally built in 1853. The latter remains, having been remodeled in 2022 (while the Old Port brewpub was relocated down the street in 2011, then closed in 2022). They opened a production brewery in Gorham in 2005. The original South Portland location was replaced by the Scarborough brewpub, just a bit south, in 2009. The Kennebunk brewpub opened in 2010. In 2018, they built the current brewery (and restaurant), selling the old production brewery to Lone Pine Brewing. And in 2022, they installed a new sophisticated canning line manufactured in Italy which enabled them to package up to 200 cans per minute (compared to 70 on the previous system); perhaps more importantly, it filled the cans in a sealed environment securing more shelf stability (up from about 90 days to four months, according to Adams).

While drinkers might not think much about packaging technology, such improvements are vital to maintaining the value of craft beer.

Advertisement

“In recent years especially, people go for quality instead of quantity,” Haines says, explaining the popularity of places like Sebago. “Craft beers are fresh and local. And all of these small brewers have a good vibe – when you can get a pint in a Maine tasting room, it’s the freshest beer you can get.”

Brianna Soukup/Staff Photographer

When asked about which of their own beers they most appreciate, the three partners’ answers express the brewery’s contemporary range. Adams clearly gravitates toward IPAs, citing Frye’s Leap, Hop Swap (which rotates its hops each iteration), and No Comply, a West-Coast-style IPA. (At the time of writing, the first two were available in the brewery taproom.)

Monarch “loves how IPA has proliferated and evolved over the years,” but he is particularly “intrigued” by the brewery’s barrel-aged beers. The brewery taproom had three available at their anniversary party: Racking My Brain, a barrel-fruited sour fermented on brett in wine barrels, with fresh raspberries added later; Bog So Hard, a barrel-aged cranberry saison aged in pinot noir and gin barrels; and the 2022 Barleywine, aged 10 months in bourbon barrels from Widow Jane and Woodford Reserve. (Of note, the brewery was still selling four-packs of their “vertical release” of barleywines, with one can each from the 2019 to 2022 versions. Just 250 of these went up for sale; one fewer was available after my visit.)

Haines’s favorite is a deep cut from the brewery’s back catalog – and a style seldomly seen in modern times. Milestone was a steinbier made in 2010. As he describes it, “We took a barrel and heated up granite stones and dropped them in the wort. The wort caramelized over the stones and created this toasty flavor that was very complex.” The brewers then used Citra hops (the first time Sebago used the now ubiquitous hop variety), adding stone fruit notes. Traditional with a spark of innovation – these are the sorts of adaptations that have made craft beer so vital in Maine.

This union of the artisanal and the experimental perhaps explains Sebago’s persistence for a quarter-century.

“There are a lot of headwinds for craft beer,” Adams notes. And we’ve seen younger breweries respond by opening multiple locations and adopting the brewpub model, combining quality food with fresh and local beer. In a sense, what is old has become new again, and breweries like Sebago have charted that path (though nothing is certain).

“I think most importantly breweries that are innovating and doing things a little bit differently every day will be more sustainable,” Adams says, “as opposed to expecting the same results from doing the same thing we’ve done in the past.”

That said, history demonstrates that there is always an appetite for social spaces like brewpubs. “Our entire business is about getting people together to connect and socialize,” Monarch said. “That’s why we started Sebago Brewing Company in the first place.”

Comments are no longer available on this story

Send questions/comments to the editors.

Stepping down, Sebago town manager moving on to life’s next phase

August 12th, 2022Staff WriterSEBAGO — Michele Bukoveckas is ready for her next big jump in life.For 19 years, she served as the Town of Sebago town clerk and tax collector.Then, she took a major leap and became town manager.Now after five years as Sebago’s municipal leader, she is set to enter the semi-retired phase of her life.Bukoveckas’ last day is Tuesday, Aug. 30.“I am moving into a semi-retired phase of my life that will enable me to spend more t...

August 12th, 2022

Staff Writer

SEBAGO — Michele Bukoveckas is ready for her next big jump in life.

For 19 years, she served as the Town of Sebago town clerk and tax collector.

Then, she took a major leap and became town manager.

Now after five years as Sebago’s municipal leader, she is set to enter the semi-retired phase of her life.

Bukoveckas’ last day is Tuesday, Aug. 30.

“I am moving into a semi-retired phase of my life that will enable me to spend more time with my husband and my grandchildren. With any hope, my husband plans to work at least a couple more years before he retires, so I’ll look to get something comparable to his schedule so we can travel more,” she said. “Life is too short, tomorrow is never promised.”

A public “Open House Farewell Celebration” will be held on Wednesday, Aug. 17 from 8 to 10 a.m. at the Sebago Town Office. The Clerk’s Office will be closed for business during the open house.

“I just had a new grandbaby arrive on July 4. I love my grandsons deeply and look forward to running through the fields with them,” she said. “Time flies when you’re having fun (Michele noted that she had started her 25th year in Sebago on June 21). I knew there would be some ups and downs. Covid had to be the most challenging obstacles I had to deal with. I’ve seen just about everything — from the fire truck going into the lake, to all the numerous storms that we’ve had in town, taking the electricity for 90% of the town for 14 days — it’s been a challenge.”

And, there have been accomplishments Bukoveckas is proud of, including approval at town meeting of a new public safety building, bringing the powers-that-be — MDOT, Portland Water District, DEP and town — to get together to discuss the drainage issue on Route 114 (“I’m hoping that in the future we have a solution to that problem,” she said), purchasing new plow trucks, upgrading the grader and roll-off truck while “trying not to hit the taxpayers too hard.”

While responsibilities changed over time, Bukoveckas’ approach to the job — be it as clerk or town manager — remained consistent.

“I tried to be realistic in my approach. You try to look at things from all angles. You try to find if there is going to be a problem and try to circumnavigate that problem. I believe in taking one’s time and taking a methodical approach,” she said.

The town manager role was “what I thought it would be,” Bukoveckas noted.

“There were a lot of sleepless nights. A lot of hours. I was ready for the change. If you count what I did in the City of Saco (I was the welfare director and assistant clerk for 9 ½ years), I did that job (being a clerk) for almost 29 years, I was ready for a change. It was a nice change,” she said. “We all know that town managers come and go (typically 2 to 5 years). No, I am not going to another town. I want something that is completely different when I do my next jump. I want something where I will be physically active. And, just have fun.”

What will she miss most not reporting to the Town Office each day?

“My staff and the townspeople. I’ve made many nice, life-long relationships. I’ve had a fantastic staff. I can’t do my job without them. A leader is only as good as their staff. Enough said,” she said. “One of the things that hit me recently is the last of the three selectmen that hired me back in 1998 passed away. They were the beginning; and the last one passed away as I am moving on from the Town of Sebago. It’s a bit surreal for me.”

Town Clerk Maureen Scanlon has been named to serve as interim manager once Bukoveckas leaves office on Aug. 30. The town has hired Maine Municipal Association to assist the Select Board in the search for a new manager.

“I did enjoy what I did, but when I go home at night, I want to spend time with the family now. I’m not fully retiring, I am going to work part-time, but it is going to be something completely different,” she added. “Town Manager is a 24/7 job. When you have to make the call in the winter time to close the town office, you’re going to upset somebody. You learn to disagree.”

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
Go to Top